Top 28 best paying trade jobs 2021

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trade

The 28 Highest-Paying Trade Jobs

Trade School Programs and Careers

Many people believe that a college degree is necessary to find a rewarding and lucrative career. However, skilled trades offer in-demand and well-paying opportunities that do not require this level of education. Additionally, trade school takes significantly less time and money to complete than a traditional four-year program.

Many high-paying trade careers are available through vocational programs, including construction management, electrical and electronic engineering, boilermaking, and radiation therapy.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has released salary and career outlook projections for different trades. These projections show that the highest-paying trade jobs are in engineering, management, and information technology. There are also many successful careers in trades that offer good pay and long-term prospects, such as welding, carpentry, and plumbing. If you’re interested in a trade career but don’t know which one to choose, we recommend consulting with an expert or using our list of the best trades to learn more about each one’s pay and career outlook.

The Highest-Paid Trade Jobs

This guide includes a ranked list of the 28  highest-paying trade jobs. Our methodology considers current BLS projections for median annual salaries and job growth for the most popular trade careers.

1. Construction Managers

Required Education: Associate degree (minimum)
Job Outlook (2019-29): +8%
Median Annual Salary: $97,180

Construction managers are responsible for overseeing a wide range of construction projects, from public to commercial to residential. They must have strong business, leadership, technical and communication skills in order to be successful.

A construction management degree program can help graduates manage workers, prepare budgets, and understand blueprints and other technical documents.

Construction managers need at least an associate degree and on-the-job training. They can improve their earning potential and work on larger projects by completing a bachelor’s degree. Obtaining professional certification from the American Institute of Contractors or the Construction Management Association of America can also improve job prospects. Some states require construction managers to hold a license, such as in California, Connecticut, New York, Oregon, and Washington.

2. Elevator and Escalator Installers and Repairers

Required Education: High school diploma or equivalent (minimum)
Job Outlook (2019-29): +7%
Median Annual Salary: $88,540

Elevator and escalator installers and repairers fix, maintain, and install escalators and elevators. They need to be mechanically savvy as well as have the strength to work at height for long periods of time. They also need to have good troubleshooting skills in order to diagnose problems quickly.

Apprenticeship programs typically have 4 years of on-the-job training, with the opportunity to gain additional skills through apprenticeship courses or continuing education. Most states require elevator and escalator installers and repairers to hold a license, which provides them with ongoing training and keep them up-to-date on industry technology changes.

If you want to advance your career in the elevator industry, earning a professional certification through one of these organizations may be a good way to go.

3. Radiation Therapists

Required Education: Associate degree
Job Outlook (2019-29): +7%
Median Annual Salary: $86,850

Radiation therapists provide radiation therapy to patients with cancer and other diseases. They need technical skills, physical stamina, and close attention to detail in order to treat patients effectively. Radiation therapists work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, or outpatient care centers.

In trade school, students learn about the pathology and treatment planning of different diseases, such as cancer. They also learn about oncology and radiation physics, which are important aspects of radiation therapy. Radiation therapy associate programs teach students how to operate medical machinery in a clinical setting so that they can provide effective care for patients.

Radiation therapists are generally paid more than other trade jobs that require a license. To earn a license, they must graduate from an accredited radiation therapy program and pass a national certification exam. After earning their license, radiation therapists can advance by completing certification and additional education to become medical dosimetrists who calculate radiation doses for cancer patients.

4. Nuclear Medicine Technologists

Required Education: Associate degree
Job Outlook (2019-29): +5%
Median Annual Salary: $79,590

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Nuclear medicine technologists are healthcare professionals who work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, medical labs, and outpatient care centers. They also support physicians by preparing and administering radiopharmaceutical drugs. Their job duties include explaining procedures to patients, operating imaging equipment, keeping patient records and maintaining safety standards.

Students in nuclear medicine technology programs gain experience in a variety of laboratory settings and with radioactive drugs. They are also taught about safety procedures and how to use personal protective equipment to avoid accidental exposure to radiation.

Most nuclear medicine technologists hold an associate degree, but some gain a bachelor’s degree and pursue certification. Licensing requirements vary by state.

5. Dental Hygienists

Required Education: Associate degree
Job Outlook (2019-29): +6%
Median Annual Salary: $77,090

Dental hygienists work under the supervision of a dentist to provide preventive care and look for dental disease in patients. They use various tools to remove plaque, take x-rays, apply fluoride, and educate patients on oral hygiene. Common employers include private dental offices, community health clinics, and public health facilities.

Dental hygienist programs usually take three years and include classroom, clinical, and laboratory instruction. Classes in anatomy and physiology, periodontics, radiography, and patient management are also required.

Dental hygienists need a license in every state, and licensure often requires students to obtain an associate degree accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CDA) and pass an exam. While job duties vary, some states allow hygienists to administer anesthesia, remove sutures, and place fillings. They can advance in their careers by earning a bachelor’s or transitioning from direct patient care into management roles.

6. Electrical and Electronics Engineering Technicians

Required Education: Associate degree
Job Outlook (2019-29): +2%
Median Annual Salary: $67,550

Electrical and electronics engineering technicians are responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of electronic equipment. They use a variety of tools to create and maintain these devices, including machine tools and drawing instruments. In addition to working in manufacturing or research and development environments, they often work in engineering services or with the federal government.

In trade school, students learn to read blueprints and engineering instructions, write reports, and record data. They take classes in physics, programming languages, circuitry, and chemistry. Electrical and electronic engineering programs may hold accreditation from the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Electrical and electronic engineers need mechanical, logical thinking, and observational skills in their work. To demonstrate advanced knowledge in the field, technicians may apply for certifications from the National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies (NICET), the International Society of Automation (ISA), or ETA International.

7. Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanics and Technicians

Required Education: Trade school and/or associate degree
Job Outlook (2019-29): +5%
Median Annual Salary: $66,680

Aviation equipment mechanics and technicians work on planes to keep them in flying condition. They may find problems with the electrical system or mechanical parts, and then try to fix them. Electronic instrument technicians also work on planes, installing panels and fixing instruments.

Major employers in the air transportation industry include aerospace parts manufacturers, support services for air transportation, scheduled air transportation, and the federal government. Employees work in locations near major airports.

Aircraft and avionics equipment mechanics and technicians typically attend an FAA-approved aviation maintenance trade school, earning an associate degree. Aircraft mechanics must have completed a certification program or be under the supervision of a certified mechanic in order to advance in their careers. Mechanics with inspector authorization have many opportunities for advancement.

8. Boilermakers

Required Education: High school diploma or equivalent
Job Outlook (2019-29): +1%
Median Annual Salary: $65,360

Boilermakers are responsible for assembling, repairing, and maintaining boilers and other large containers used in buildings, ships, and factories. They typically read blueprints to ensure the boiler is operating correctly, test systems for leaks to prevent accidents, replace broken parts if necessary , and clean vessels.

Boilermakers often work outside in all weather conditions, and their job duties involve physical stamina and adherence to safety precautions.

Boilermakers receive technical training and education that cover a variety of topics, including using boilermaker tools, following safety practices, reading and sketching blueprints, and following installation techniques. Apprentices gain skills in welding, knot-tying, rigging, and fabrication. The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers offers a national apprenticeship program that may be shortened for welders with experience in pipefitting or sheet metal work.

9. Construction and Building Inspectors

Required Education: High school diploma or equivalent (minimum)
Job Outlook (2019-29): +3%
Median Annual Salary: $62,860

Building inspectors are responsible for ensuring that all construction projects comply with applicable building codes, zoning regulations, and other regulatory requirements. They spend a majority of their time inspecting buildings and other structures in order to ensure that they meet safety standards. Additionally, inspectors may also inspect electrical systems, plumbing systems, and heating/air conditioning systems during their inspections. If necessary, inspectors will also approve building plans or issue notices for non-compliant structures

Building inspectors are specialized professionals who inspect homes, businesses, and other buildings for safety. They may work for local or state government, engineering services, construction companies, or be self-employed.

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In order to become a building or construction inspector, most states require that the individual hold licensure or certification and complete continuing education courses. This may provide the best opportunity for future advancement in the field.

10. Electricians

Required Education: High school diploma or equivalent (minimum)
Job Outlook (2019-29): +8%
Median Annual Salary: $56,900

Electricians repair, maintain, and install electrical systems in buildings. Apprentices typically complete a four- or five-year apprenticeship. Some attend a technical program covering basic electrical information, circuitry, and safety before starting their apprenticeship.

Apprenticeship programs for electricians include paid on-the-job training and technical instruction. Electrician apprentices who complete a trade program may qualify for a shortened apprenticeship, gaining skills in fire alarm systems, soldering, electrical code requirements, and blueprint reading. Unions and contractor associations offer electrician apprenticeships. Apprentices who complete an apprenticeship can qualify as journey workers with limited supervision and work without pay during their training period.

Electricians must pass a test and earn a license in most states. After completing a certain number of field hours, they can become masters electricians.

11. Power Plant Operator

Power plant operators are responsible for maintaining the equipment that generates electricity. They work in rotating shifts, often during nighttime, weekends, and holidays. Their main responsibilities involve reading meters and calibrating equipment. They also need to manipulate switches, breakers, and valves to keep the equipment running smoothly.

  • Average salary: $103,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • College or vocational school (recommended)
    • Extensive on-the-job training
    • U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission license

12. Elevator Mechanic

Elevator mechanics are responsible for repairing, maintaining, and installing elevators. They need stamina, strength, and the ability to work at heights in order to do their job properly. Elevator mechanics must be able to replace faulty parts and test equipment to ensure that elevators are functioning safely.

  • Average salary: $99,500
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Four-year apprenticeship program
    • State license

13. Electric Lineman

If you are okay with working at heights for most of your day, you might want to consider becoming an electric lineman. This job involves maintaining, repairing, and installing electric power lines and electrical distribution equipment. It is also a dangerous occupation due to the height and high-voltage equipment, as well as working outside in all weather conditions.

  • Average salary: $85,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Three-year apprenticeship
    • On-the-job training
    • Certifications (recommended)

14. Nuclear Medicine Technician

If you’re interested in a career in the medical field, nuclear medicine technicians may be a good fit. These professionals work in hospitals, medical labs, and care centers to prepare radiopharmaceutical drugs and administer them to patients for imaging or treatment. They also support patients by explaining procedures and operating imaging equipment.

  • Average salary: $69,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Associate’s or bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • State license

15. Aircraft Technician

If you enjoy flying planes but are not particularly interested in actually taking to the skies, becoming an aircraft technician might be a good option for you. As an aircraft technician, your job is to maintain and repair airplanes using diagnostic equipment. You may also be required to inspect aircraft, repair components, install instrument panels, and keep track of maintenance work performed on them.

  • Average salary: $68,500
  • Requirements:
    • Part 147 FAA-approved aviation maintenance technician school
    • Associate’s degree (recommended)
    • On-the-job training
    • Airframe mechanics and/or powerplant mechanics certification

16. Millwright

Millwrights are responsible for repairing, maintaining, assembling, and moving machinery in construction sites, factories, and power plants. Their other tasks include replacing defective parts and disassembling machines. Millwrights also clean and lubricate equipment.

  • Average salary: $65,500
  • Requirements:
    • High School diploma or equivalent
    • Four-year apprenticeship program
    • On-the-job training

17. Ultrasound Technologist

Ultrasound technicians are specialists in imaging medical conditions with sound waves. They operate diagnostic equipment to help doctors diagnose conditions and assess the health of patients. Some ultrasound technicians specialize in imaging different parts of the body, such as the cardiovascular system, reproductive health, and pediatric care.

  • Average salary: $62,500
  • Requirements:
    • Associate’s degree or postsecondary certificate
    • Professional certification
    • Basic life support certification (recommended)

18. Pipefitter

Pipefitters are responsible for installing and maintaining piping systems in construction, commercial, and residential areas. They do this by reading blueprints and then following them to completion. When something goes wrong with a pipe system, pipefitters must be able to fix it quickly so that the system can function properly.

  • Average salary: $60,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Vocational school
    • Four or five-year apprenticeship program
    • State license

19. Real Estate Appraiser

Appraisers are responsible for providing an estimate of the value of real estate, such as a building, land, or personal property. They typically work with people who own or manage properties and must have great attention to detail and strong interpersonal skills in order to assist them. Some of their tasks include preparing financial estimates of properties, evaluating issues that affect the value, inspecting properties, and preparing reports.

  • Average salary: $58,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree (recommended)
    • On-the-job training
    • State license
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20. Construction Inspector

Construction inspectors spend a majority of their time on construction sites inspecting building structures, plumbing, and electrical. They review building plans, monitor construction sites to ensure alignment, leveling and elevation are correct, verify compliance with codes and regulations, issue violation notices and stop-work orders when necessary.

  • Average salary: $57,500
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • On-the-job training
    • State license

21. Electronics Technician

If you’re good at math and enjoy working with electronics, this could be a great career for you. Electronics technicians modify, test, and repair electronic components, products, and equipment. They work together with electrical engineers to troubleshoot and replace equipment components, upgrade software systems, or diagnose defects.

  • Average salary: $57,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Technical school
    • Apprenticeship program
    • Certifications (recommended)

22. Electrician

Electricians are responsible for installing, maintaining, and fixing electrical power, lighting, communication systems and control devices in buildings. They use their expertise to read blueprints and technical diagrams, inspect transformers and circuit breakers, replace wiring and equipment, as well as use testing devices to identify problems.

  • Average salary: $56,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Technical school
    • Four or five-year apprenticeship program
    • State license

23. Respiratory Therapist

Respiratory therapists care for patients who have difficulty breathing, such as chronic respiratory disease, asthma, or emphysema. They connect patients and assess their respiratory needs before providing appropriate treatments. In addition to providing emergency care to patients who have suffered from a heart attack, shock, or drowning, they can also provide long-term care for those with chronic respiratory diseases.

  • Average salary: $56,000
  • Requirements:
    • Associate’s degree
    • Vocational school
    • State license

24. Landscape Designer

As a landscape designer, you love the outdoors and creativity. You develop landscaping plans for public spaces, such as parks and outdoor spaces, with features like water fountains, walkways, and gardens. Some of your tasks may include consulting with clients to assess budgets and needs; presenting different design ideas; and evaluating drainage, vegetation, and soil conditions.

  • Average salary: $50,500
  • Requirements:
    • Bachelor’s degree
    • On-the-job training
    • State license

25. HVAC Technician

As an HVAC technician, your job is to install, maintain, and repair systems that provide ventilation, refrigeration, heating and air conditioning for homes and businesses. They also work on larger industrial units or smaller residential units. Their goal is to make the home environment more comfortable while also helping save energy and improve air quality.

  • Average salary: $45,000
  • Requirements:
    • Technical school
    • On-the-job training
    • Apprenticeship program
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) certification

26. IT Support Specialist

If you enjoy working with technology and solving problems, a career in IT support may be for you. These specialists can work at stores, online, or over the phone and help people with their tech needs by providing support ranging from troubleshooting to maintenance to answering questions.

  • Average salary: $42,500
  • Requirements:
    • Vocational school (recommended)
    • Certifications

27. Cable Technician

Cable technicians are responsible for maintaining, installing, and repairing telecommunications networks. They also help improve the speed and reach of broadband communications by going to homes and businesses when services are down.

  • Average salary: $39,500
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Technical school
    • On-the-job training
    • Certifications

28. Solar Energy System Installer

A solar energy system installer installs, assembles, and sets up solar power systems. This is a job for those with no fear of heights since most solar panels are installed on roofs.

  • Average salary: $37,000
  • Requirements:
    • High school diploma or equivalent
    • Technical school
    • On-the-job training
    • State license

What trade is in high demand right now?

What Trades Are Always in Demand? According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, solar energy systems installers, respiratory therapists, ultrasound technologists, aircraft technicians, and construction managers are seeing the highest growth rate percentage from 2020 to 203022 Highest-Paying Trade Jobs In Demand in 2022 – Mint – Intuitmint.intuit.com › BlogAbout Featured Snippets

What trade jobs make 100k a year?

Trade Jobs That Pay 6 FiguresAir traffic controller.Commercial Pilot.Construction Manager.Electrical and Electronics Repairers, Powerhouse, Substation and Relay.Elevator Installer and Repairer.First-line Supervisors of Police and Detectives.In-N-Out Manager.Nuclear Power Reactor Operators.14 Six Figure Jobs (That Don’t Require A College Degree) – Ken Ruskwww.kenrusk.com › BlogAbout Featured Snippets

Which trade makes the most money 2021?

Top 10 Highest Paying Trades 2021Aircraft and Avionics Equipment Mechanic/Technician. … Construction and Building Inspector. … Electrician. … Plumber. … Boilermaker.Wind Turbine Technician. … HVAC-R Technician. … Solar Photovoltaic Installer.Top 10 Highest Paying Trades 2021 – Great College Dealswww.greatcollegedeals.net › ListsAbout Featured Snippets

What trade makes the most money 2022?

The Top 10 High Paying Trade JobsAircraft Mechanic. $66,440. … Home Inspector. $63,150. … Cable/Fiber Optics Tech. $61,470. … Electrician. $56,900. … Plumber. $56,330. … Civil Engineer Tech. $54,080. … HVAC Technician. $50,590. … Pipefitter. $43,210.In Demand: Top Paying Trade Jobs For 2022 | US Staffing Agencywideeffect.com › blog › In+Demand+Top+Paying+Trade+Jobs+For+2022About Featured Snippets

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